New This Month: February 2017

Here are six of the many new titles Douglas County Libraries added this month. Check them out!

piecingmetogetherPiecing Me Together by Renee Watson 

Jade believes she must get out of her neighborhood if she’s ever going to succeed. Her mother says she has to take every opportunity, and she has. She accepted a scholarship to a mostly white private school and even Saturday morning test prep opportunities. But some opportunities feel more demeaning than helpful, like the invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for “at-risk” girls. Except really, it’s for black girls. From “bad” neighborhoods.

Jade doesn’t need support. And just because her mentor is black doesn’t mean she understands Jade. Maybe there are some things Jade could show these successful women about the real world and finding ways to make a real difference.

Friendship, race, privilege, identity — this compelling and thoughtful story explores the issues young women face.

 

 

tragickindofwonderfulA Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom

For 16-year-old Mel Hannigan, bipolar disorder makes life unpredictable. Her latest struggle is balancing her growing feelings in a new relationship with her instinct to keep everyone at arm’s length. When a former friend confronts Mel with the truth about how their relationship ended, deeply buried secrets threaten to come out and upend her shaky equilibrium.

As the walls of Mel’s compartmentalized world crumble, she fears the worst — that her friends will abandon her if they learn the truth about what she’s been hiding. Can Mel bring herself to risk everything to find out?

 

 

Continue reading “New This Month: February 2017”

Nonfiction Spotlight: LGBTQ+ Teens

Here are some great books for anyone looking to learn more about the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ+) community.

by Susan Kuklin

A 2015 Stonewall Honor Book, this groundbreaking work of LGBT literature takes an honest look at the lives, loves and struggles of transgender teens. Author and photographer Susan Kuklin met and interviewed six transgender or gender-neutral young adults and used her considerable skills to represent them thoughtfully and respectfully before, during and after their personal acknowledgments of gender preference. Portraits, family photographs, and candid images grace the pages, augmenting the emotional and physical journey each youth has taken. Each honest discussion and disclosure, whether joyful or heartbreaking, is completely different from the others because of family dynamics, living situations, gender, and the transition these teens make in recognition of their true selves.

 

 

 

thisbookisgay

by James Dawson

Lesbian. Bisexual. Queer. Transgender. Straight. Curious. This book is for everyone, regardless of gender or sexual preference. This book is for anyone who’s ever dared to wonder. This book is for you. There’s a long-running joke that after “coming out,” a lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans person should receive a membership card and instruction manual. Think of this as that manual. You’re welcome. Inside, you’ll find the answers to all the questions you ever wanted to ask: from sex to politics, hooking up to stereotypes, coming out and more. This candid, funny and uncensored exploration of sexuality and what it’s like to grow up LGBT also includes real stories from people across the gender and sexual spectrums, not to mention hilarious illustrations. You will be entertained. You will be informed. But most importantly, you will know that however you identify (or don’t) and whomever you love, you are exceptional. You matter. And so does this book.

 

 

 

queer

by Kathy Belge

Teen life is hard enough with all of the pressures kids face, but for teens who are LGBT it’s even harder. When do you decide to come out? To whom? Will your friends accept you? And how on earth do you meet people to date? Queer is a humorous, engaging and honest guide that helps LGBT teens come out to friends and family, navigate their new LGBT social life, figure out if a crush is also queer, and rise up against bigotry and homophobia. It also includes personal stories from the authors, and sidebars on queer history. It’s a must read for teens who think they might be queer — or know someone who is.