Fiction Feature: New Mysteries

Start off your summer with some thrilling new mysteries! Check these out:

The Pearl Thief

by Elizabeth Wein

When 15-year-old Julia Beaufort-Stuart wakes up in the hospital, she knows the lazy summer break she’d imagined won’t be exactly like she anticipated. And once she returns to her grandfather’s estate, a bit banged up but alive, she begins to realize that her injury might not have been an accident. One of her family’s employees is missing, and he disappeared on the very same day she landed in the hospital.

Desperate to figure out what happened, she befriends Euan McEwen, the Scottish Traveller boy who found her when she was injured, and his standoffish sister, Ellen. As Julia grows closer to this family, she experiences firsthand some of the prejudices they’ve grown accustomed to, a stark contrast to her own upbringing, and finds herself exploring thrilling new experiences that have nothing to do with a missing-person investigation.

Julia’s memory of that day returns to her in pieces, and when a body is discovered, her new friends are caught in the crosshairs of long-held biases about Travellers. Julia must get to the bottom of the mystery in order to keep them from being framed for the crime.

One of Us Is Lying

by Karen M. McManus

Pay close attention and you might solve this. On Monday afternoon, five students at Bayview High walk into detention. Bronwyn, the brain, is Yale-bound and never breaks a rule. Addy, the beauty, is the picture-perfect homecoming princess. Nate, the criminal, is already on probation for dealing. Cooper, the athlete, is the all-star baseball pitcher. And Simon, the outcast, is the creator of Bayview High’s notorious gossip app.

Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom alive, and according to investigators, his death wasn’t an accident. On Monday, he died. But on Tuesday, he’d planned to post juicy reveals about all four of his high-profile classmates, which makes all four of them suspects in his murder. Or are they the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose? Everyone has secrets, right?  What really matters is how far you would go to protect them.

Firebrand (Alternative Detective #2)

by A.J. Hartley

Once a steeplejack, Anglet Sutonga is used to scaling the heights of Bar-Selehm. Nowadays she assists politician Josiah Willinghouse behind the scenes of Parliament. When government plans for a secret weapon are stolen, their investigation leads right to the doorsteps of the city’s super-exclusive social club, Elitus. Ang has a chance to catch the thief, but only if she can pass for a foreign princess. Her best chance to learn the ways of royalty lies in the aloof Dahria Willinghouse and the intense Madame Nahreem, a woman possessing high standards and unusual pets.

Yet Ang has other things on her mind. Refugees from the north are trickling into the city, but an ambitious politician is proposing extreme measures to get rid of them. She soon discovers that one theft could spark a conflagration of conspiracy that threatens the most vulnerable of Bar-Selehm. Unless she can stop it.

Sherlock: A Study in Pink

by Steven Moffat
Adapting the episodes of the smash-hit BBC America/Hartswood Films TV show that sees Sherlock (Benedict Cumberbatch) and Watson (Martin Freeman) tackling brain-teasing crimes in modern-day London, this stunning manga is presented in its original right-to-left reading order, and in the full chapters as originally serialized. Meet Sherlock and Watson for the first time … all over again!

The Disappearances

by Emily Bain Murphy

What if the ordinary things in life suddenly disappeared? Aila Quinn’s mother, Juliet, has always been a mystery: Vibrant yet guarded, she keeps her secrets beyond Aila’s reach. When Juliet dies, Aila and her younger brother, Miles, are sent to live in Sterling, a rural town far from home — and the place where Juliet grew up. Sterling is a place with mysteries of its own, a place where the experiences that weave life together — scents of flowers and food, reflections from mirrors and lakes, even the ability to dream — vanish every seven years. No one knows what caused these “disappearances,” or what will slip away next. But residents of Sterling always suspected that Juliet Quinn was somehow responsible, and Aila must bear the brunt of their blame while she follows the chain of literary clues her mother left behind.

As the next disappearance nears, Aila begins to unravel the dual mystery of why the disappearances happen and who her mother truly was. One thing is clear: Sterling isn’t going to hold on to anyone’s secrets for long before it starts giving them up.

CONTEST: Advance Copy of The Bone Witch

bonewitch

The Bone Witch
by Rin Chupeco

Tea didn’t mean to raise her brother from the dead. It was a complete accident. While witchcraft is normal in her world, necromancy is another thing, and now she’s an outcast. Tea journeys to another land to learn more about her powers — powers that will come in handy as dark forces gain strength and threaten the land.

This is the first in a new series, due out in March.

Sound like something you’d enjoy? Leave a comment below for a chance to win an advance reader copy of The Bone Witch. Don’t wait! The door closes on this opportunity March 2.

Books With Buzz: The Hate U Give

hateugive

The Hate U Give
by Angie Thomas

Every day, Starr Carter feels like she’s being torn in two. At home, she’s one person, at school she’s another. But really, she doesn’t feel like she fits in either place. She can’t be herself at the private prep school she attends because she is one of just a few black students. And she doesn’t fit in with her poor neighborhood because she attends a private prep school rather than the nearby public high school. It’s not easy, but she manages.

But then one day, she accepts a ride home from a party from a neighborhood friend, Khalil.

They get pulled over by the police.

Khalil is shot and killed.

Khalil is black.

The officer is white.

Khalil was unarmed.

As the only witness, Starr is suddenly in the middle of a national media frenzy.

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, Thomas explores race with an emphatic, approachable voice. The book’s not even out yet, but there is already talk about a movie adaptation. Rumor has it Amandla Stenberg, who you’d recognize as Rue from The Hunger Games, will star as Starr. Get your name on the hold list now.

New This Month: February 2017

Here are six of the many new titles Douglas County Libraries added this month. Check them out!

piecingmetogetherPiecing Me Together by Renee Watson 

Jade believes she must get out of her neighborhood if she’s ever going to succeed. Her mother says she has to take every opportunity, and she has. She accepted a scholarship to a mostly white private school and even Saturday morning test prep opportunities. But some opportunities feel more demeaning than helpful, like the invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for “at-risk” girls. Except really, it’s for black girls. From “bad” neighborhoods.

Jade doesn’t need support. And just because her mentor is black doesn’t mean she understands Jade. Maybe there are some things Jade could show these successful women about the real world and finding ways to make a real difference.

Friendship, race, privilege, identity — this compelling and thoughtful story explores the issues young women face.

 

 

tragickindofwonderfulA Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom

For 16-year-old Mel Hannigan, bipolar disorder makes life unpredictable. Her latest struggle is balancing her growing feelings in a new relationship with her instinct to keep everyone at arm’s length. When a former friend confronts Mel with the truth about how their relationship ended, deeply buried secrets threaten to come out and upend her shaky equilibrium.

As the walls of Mel’s compartmentalized world crumble, she fears the worst — that her friends will abandon her if they learn the truth about what she’s been hiding. Can Mel bring herself to risk everything to find out?

 

 

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Swoon Reads

sandyhallAttention all YA writers: Have you heard of the awesome website Swoon Reads?

I just finished the first book it published, A Little Something Different by Sandy Hall. It is a sweet and unique romance story told with 14 different perspectives. At the end of the book there is an author interview, where Sandy Hall talks about getting her book published through Swoon Reads. I looked up this website and it is a great resource for anyone interested in writing a book or reading new books. Here is some info excerpted from Swoon Reads’ FAQs page.

What is Swoon Reads?

Swoon Reads publishes young adult and new adult novels. Writers can submit their original, unpublished manuscript to the Swoon Reads website, and readers who sign up can rate and comment on manuscripts to help choose which titles are published. Swoon Reads is an imprint of Macmillan publishing under Feiwel & Friends and was founded by Jean Feiwel. For more information, please see the site’s About page.

How does the site work?

Writers can upload their unpublished, original young adult or new adult manuscript and community members are able to read, rate and comment on those submissions. The Swoon Reads staff uses community reviews and ratings to help choose which books to publish. Chosen manuscripts are published in both print and e-book formats.

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